Thought for the Day: life without edges

Worthy of note, this post from a while back from the American Thinker[*1] :

The Left’s offer of a life without edges began when Franklin Delano Roosevelt pushed Social Security as a kind of investment without risk in 1935. Through payroll deductions, which are simply taxes by another name, Social Security was created with the understanding that the working class would have guaranteed retirement savings. Today, we know that this grand promise of investment without risk has amounted to investment without return. It is impoverishing rather enriching for the hard working people who gain approximately two percent annual interest on their retirement savings in Social Security, while private savings accounts pay eight percent or more annually.

And where is the Left on this issue when a Republican Senator or Congressman calls for privatization of Social Security? They are aligned with Hillary’s and Obama’s position of refusing to look at the facts when people point out the bankruptcy of leftist contrivances like universal healthcare.

In 1947 the Left discovered the Separation of Church and State in the Constitution. This eventually led the benevolent Left to protect us from too much exposure to religion by prohibiting prayer in public schools. Ironically, this new separation from religion “for our own good” has resulted not simply in schools without prayer, but education without morality. But of course, the problem is that the Left is still teaching a morality; it is simply not a Christian one.

It seems to me that much of the difference in worldview between the well-meaning Left and the well-meaning Right is that those on the Left tend to believe that people can be consistently good, honest, kind, and well-meaning, if given the proper leadership.  Thus, those on the Left are always surprised when their well-meaning interventions fail–sometimes, as in the Soviet Union, quite spectacularly.

Those on the Right tend to believe that people are in fact quite inconsistently good, honest, kind, and well-meaning.  This is why the American Founding Fathers sought to strictly limit the amount of power that we gave to our government.

Limits to the powers wielded by politicians and governments are almost always better than expanding those political powers, because the expansion of those powers tends to have negative unexpected consequences that the Left never anticipates.  A life without edges tends to toss a lot of people right off of the edge, in the name of “equality” and “fairness.”

You can never guarantee either.  The best that flawed Man can do is strive to provide the best environment for those who choose to may seek to better themselves.  That system, from empirical evidence, is truly free-market capitalism tempered by a truly limited government of tightly enumerated powers.

We don’t really have either any more, anywhere on Earth.  More’s the pity.

World cruise tips

Some helpful hints from Cruise Critic[*1] , with helpful little notes on such things as:
Cruising Segments
How to Pick a Cruise Line
Make a Date
How to Pick a Cabin
What to Pack

Thought for the day–on taxation

Catching up on some blog reading, and came across this from the QandO Blog[*1] , a link to an Arnold Kling post[*2] :

Message to Republicans: if you cut spending on “worthy causes” to zero, you still would not balance the budget. You will have to raise personal income taxes.

Message to Democrats: if you increased personal income tax receipts by 25 percent (a ginormous tax increase), you still would not balance the budget. You will have to cut back on “worthy causes.”

Message to the AARP: if Social Security and Medicare continue to be “untouchable,” then y’all had better buy guns, because in twenty years there won’t be any money left to pay for national defense, much less for any “worthy causes.”

Ditto that from me.  Bigtime.

NCAA Women’s Final Four 2008 (3 of 3)

Here’s some pictures from our annual trip to the NCAA Division I Women’s Final Four basketball tournament, this year in Tampa, Florida, in three posts.  Post three is Championship Tuesday:

Gearing up for the Championship Game
No pictures, please, says Jean
A penguin. We don’t know why.
Drinks, anyone? The pre-game party outside the arena
Tom and the Girls
It’s a final–the Volunteers are champs again
Pat and the Lady Vols, 2008 NCAA Champs!

NCAA Women’s Final Four 2008 (2 of 3)

Here’s some pictures from our annual trip to the NCAA Division I Women’s Final Four basketball tournament, this year in Tampa, Florida, in three posts.  Post two runs through the semi-final games: The KC Volunteers:

Pam and Jean
Kathy
Margaret

Snookums complains that I don’t take enough pictures of the two of us together. This particular series of photo posts won’t help matters. Sorry, dear!

Snookums and Jean chat up the General
Everybody Orange Up for the semifinal
Inside the St. Pete Times Forum
Vol alumnae teammates (and hubbies)

NCAA Women’s Final Four 2008 (1 of 3)

Here’s some pictures from our annual trip to the NCAA Division I Women’s Final Four basketball tournament, this year in Tampa, Florida, in three posts.  Post one occurs before the games begin:

Dinner outside at Harborside, watching a Florida thunderstorm go by
At the Columbia Restaurant with the National Championship trophy
Columbia Restaurant flamenco dancers, as seen on ESPN
ESPN crew, at the back of the Columbia Restaurant
Hoop City, here we come